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THE RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH BULLYING VICTIMIZATION AMONG WASHINGTON, D.C. MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS: AN ANALYSIS OF THE 2012 YOUTH RISK BEHAVIOR SURVEY (YRBS)

thesis
posted on 2023-09-07, 05:09 authored by David J. Hawthorne

Bullying is a serious problem in the United States. The individual and community characteristics that protect against bullying are of interest in bullying prevention research. This study analyzed secondary data from the 2012 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) administered in Washington, DC, to determine the relationship between bullying victimization and select sociodemographic, social, and environmental variables. The analysis included chi-square analysis, and logistic regression to examine the association of gender, race, grade, body mass index (BMI), academic achievement, sexual orientation, sports activity, gang membership, school support, and suicidal ideation with bullying victimization. Overall, 34 percent and 15 percent of middle school and high school students respectively were bullied (either in school or cyber) in the 12 months before the survey. Results also showed that being bullied in the past 12 months was significantly more common among females than males, in earlier school grades, among students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or unsure compared to heterosexual males. Bullied students were also more likely to report having an adult in school to go to if they had a problem and had higher grades compared to students with lower grades. White students were more likely to report being bullied than other races, but the difference in race was only significant for high school students. Bullying victimization was also significantly associated with student reports of suicidal ideation, highlighting the burden that bullying is placing on students within the District.

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Publisher

American University

Language

English

Notes

Electronic thesis available to American University authorized users only, per author's request.

Handle

http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:70478

Degree grantor

American University. School of Education

Degree level

  • Masters

Submission ID

11186

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