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SERIAL FEATURE POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE DISCRIMINATION LEARNING IN A TASTE AVOIDANCE PREPARATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTEROCEPTIVE CONTROL OF BEHAVIOR

thesis
posted on 2024-01-09, 16:46 authored by Shihui Huang

Psychoactive drugs produce interoceptive stimuli that can guide behaviors by initiating or inhibiting responding. The current study investigated whether an interoceptive morphine state produces similar patterns of serial feature positive (FP) and feature negative (FN) discrimination learning under comparable conditions in a taste avoidance design. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were trained under 10 cycles of FP or FN discrimination. In the FP task, morphine (10 mg/kg, IP) signaled that a saccharin solution was followed by LiCl (1.2 mEq, IP), while the vehicle (saline) signaled that the LiCl was withheld. In the FN task, the contingency was reversed. The FP-trained rats acquired the discrimination after three training cycles, consuming significantly less saccharin on morphine, than on vehicle, sessions (P < 0.05). The FN-trained rats acquired the discrimination after six training cycles, consuming more on morphine than on vehicle sessions (P < 0.05). However, FN-trained rats never recovered saccharin consumption to baseline levels and 40% of the rats continued to avoid saccharin (consuming 0 ml) on morphine sessions. Control rats that never received LiCl consumed high levels of saccharin on morphine and vehicle sessions, indicating that morphine did not produce unconditioned suppression of saccharin consumption. The difficulty to acquire FN discrimination might reflect the limitations of learning about safety contingencies in the taste avoidance design. The rapidity of FP learning when a drug state signals an aversive contingency may have implications for the general role of interoceptive stimuli in the control of behavior.

History

Publisher

American University

Language

English

Committee chair

Anthony Riley

Committee member(s)

David N. Kearns; Terry Davidson

Degree discipline

Neuroscience

Degree grantor

American University. College of Arts and Sciences

Degree level

  • Masters

Degree name

M.S. in Neuroscience

Local identifier

Huang_american_0008N_12114.pdf

Media type

application/pdf

Pagination

41 pages

Access statement

Electronic thesis is restricted to authorized American University users only, per author's request.

Submission ID

12114

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