American University
Browse
thesesdissertations_2846_OBJ.pdf (1.98 MB)

Pop-diplomacy: Anime and manga as vehicles of cultural context, identity formation, and hybridity

Download (1.98 MB)
thesis
posted on 2023-09-06, 03:05 authored by Morgan Elizabeth Burkett

The purpose of this thesis is to critically examine how a community, or "fandom," of American consumers is interacting with certain aspects of Japanese popular culture and to explore these interactions as sites of cultural negotiation. Specifically, the purpose is to explore the rise in popularity of Japanese manga and anime, as well as the associated subcultures, in the US within a theoretical framework of hybridization and ask: How is the community framing discussions of cultural context and identity formation and are its members engaging in the hybridization of culture? In the case studies, fieldwork conducted at anime conventions and through analysis of public discussion on community web forums highlight two sites of cultural negotiation: conventions and cosplay and fansubs.

History

Publisher

American University

Language

English

Notes

Thesis (M.A.)--American University, 2009.

Handle

http://hdl.handle.net/1961/thesesdissertations:2846

Media type

application/pdf

Access statement

Part of thesis digitization project, awaiting processing.

Usage metrics

    Theses and Dissertations

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC