American University
Browse
thesesdissertations_5601_OBJ.pdf (2.37 MB)

Facial expression vs. eye direction: Young children's choices in ascribing mental states

Download (2.37 MB)
thesis
posted on 2023-09-06, 03:33 authored by Ann Bryan Sollinger

The ability to utilize nonverbal cues is important for children's development of social skills. The theory-of-mind literature has focused on children's ability to perceive eye direction, but facial expression is also an important cue to mental states. Given the significance of facial expression, it may be important to determine how and when children use both eye direction and facial expression to solve social tasks. Two hundred and eleven children, ages 2--8 years, completed a variant of Baron-Cohen's "Charlie and the Sweets" task and a task which tested their comprehension of knowledge states. Results suggest that children under five prefer facial expression over eye direction when attributing desire and knowledge. Findings also reveal that knowing was a more difficult for children to infer. Given the current data, future studies and models of theory of mind may need to consider the role of affect along with that of eye direction.

History

Publisher

ProQuest Dissertations & Theses

Language

English

Notes

Thesis (M.A.)--American University, 2002.

Handle

http://hdl.handle.net/1961/thesesdissertations:5601

Media type

application/pdf

Access statement

Part of thesis digitization project, awaiting processing.

Usage metrics

    Theses and Dissertations

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC