American University
Browse
auislandora_84091_OBJ.pdf (1.4 MB)

CARBON FIBER MICROELECTRODES MODIFIED WITH POLYMERS FOR ENHANCED NEUROCHEMICAL DETECTION OF DOPAMINE AND METABOLITES

Download (1.4 MB)
thesis
posted on 2023-08-04, 08:53 authored by Pauline Marie Marthe Wonnenberg

While different electrochemical sensors have been introduced over the past thirty years,carbon fiber-microelectrodes (CFMEs) are considered to be the standard electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), an electroanalytical method, primarily uses CFMEs and has the ability to measure neurochemical dynamics in real time. In conjunction with FSCV, CFMEs have the capability to accurately measure the oxidation of several crucial neurotransmitters, like dopamine, producing specific cyclic voltammograms for certain ionizable analytes of interest. Improvements in neurochemical detection with CFMEs were previously made through the coating of polymers onto the surface of the carbon fiber. In this work, polymers such as polyethyleneimine (PEI), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), and Nafion were electrodeposited onto the surface of the electrodes to enhance neurochemical detection. This work demonstrates applications for enhancements in co-detection of similarly structured neurochemicals such as dopamine, and metabolites of dopamine such as 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), 3,4- Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and other neurotransmitters. Manipulating the charge and surface structure of the carbon electrode allows for the improvement of sensitivity and selectivity of neurotransmitter detection. The analytes are detected and differentiated by the shape and the peak positions of their respective cyclic voltammograms. In addition, ex-vivo measurements and qualification of several neurotransmitters in zebrafish brain models are shown.

History

Publisher

American University

Notes

Degree Awarded: M.S. Chemistry. American University

Handle

http://hdl.handle.net/1961/auislandora:84091

Usage metrics

    Theses and Dissertations

    Categories

    No categories selected

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC